Storm surge Essays & Research Papers

Best Storm surge Essays

  • STORM SURGE - 1119 Words
    STORM SURGE A storm surge is a coastal flood or tsunami-like phenomenon of rising water commonly associated with low pressure weather systems (such as tropical cyclones and strong extratropical cyclones), the severity of which is affected by the shallowness and orientation of the water body relative to storm path, and the timing of tides. Most casualties during tropical cyclones occur as the result of storm surges The two main meteorological factors contributing to a storm surge are a long...
    1,119 Words | 4 Pages
  • Sandy Storm - 1278 Words
    Hurricane Sandy The day was March 18th 1967 the location was Caraguatatuba Brazil. On this day Brazil suffered it’s worst natural disaster when continuing rains and rising ocean temperatures brought on flooding and mudslides that killed at least 500 people (J.Masters/wonderblog.com). Nine months later and two hundred miles away on December 4, 1967 I was born. Though I didn’t experience first hand the effects of that storm my parents did. I had never experienced anything like it until two...
    1,278 Words | 4 Pages
  • An essay comparing and contrasting the effects of a tropical storm in a MEDC country and a LEDC country
    All natural disasters cause havoc but one of the most common natural disasters are Hurricanes. They occur in both LEDC countries and MEDC countries. The USA is an example of a MEDC country which copes with the mess and destruction a hurricane causes and Bangladesh is an LEDC country that has to cope with hurricanes. However they both cope in entirely different ways due to one thing. Money. The USA has enough money to afford expensive, accurate technology to track when a hurricane will arrive...
    340 Words | 1 Page
  • To What Extent Can Preparedness Mitigate The Impacts Of Tropical Revolving Storms
    To what extent can preparedness mitigate the impacts of tropical revolving storms? (40 marks) Tropical revolving storms can be referred to as Hurricanes, cyclones and Typhoons these occur in the Atlantic, Indian and pacific oceans. Nobody is quite sure how they form but certain factors do need to be met for one to form. One of these is the temperature of the sea which has to be above 28degrees, the water also has to be deep beneath the storm, this is how the storm gathers its energy. These...
    1,107 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Storm surge Essays

  • To what extent can preparedness and planning mitigate the effects of tropical revolving storms
    To what extent can preparedness and planning mitigate the effects of tropical revolving storms? (40 marker) A tropical revolving storm is a term that covers hurricanes, tropical cyclones, typhoons and willy-willies. These intense low-pressure weather systems are associated with catastrophic wind speeds averaging at 120kmph and torrential rainfall. Tropical revolving storms are huge and extremely violent extending to about 500km in diameter. They occur in the tropics and the sub-tropics and...
    1,224 Words | 4 Pages
  • "The Debate over Coastal Developments Poses a Danger to Coastal Cities at Risk to Storms and Rising Sea Levels"
    "The Debate over Coastal Developments Poses a Danger to Coastal Cities at Risk to Storms and Rising Sea Levels" The purpose for this essay is to summarize and respond to the article by Jennifer Weeks. Her article's central theme is on the "Coastal Development and the risk posed for these communities when flooding, super storms, and rising sea levels continue to impact these cities in these coastal zones. Coastal cities in these zones would be highly vulnerable to flooding during storms and...
    1,359 Words | 5 Pages
  • To what extent can preparedness and planning mitigate the effects of tropical revolving storms? [40]
    To what extent can preparedness and planning mitigate the effects of tropical revolving storms? [40] Tropical revolving storms are also known as hurricanes, typhoons and cyclones. They occur in the tropics and sub-tropics and form over the oceans where sea surface temperatures are above 27 degrees C. The impact of tropical revolving storms can be devastating. Examples of major natural disasters caused by these storms are Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and Tropical Cyclone Nargis in 2008. The main...
    557 Words | 2 Pages
  • To What Extent Are The Impacts Of Tropical Revolving Storms Determined By Human Factors Rather Than Physical Factors
    To what extent are the impacts of Tropical Revolving storms determined by human factors rather than physical factors? (40marks) A tropical revolving storm is a huge and extremely violent tropical storm which can be up to 500km in diameter. The Coriolis force is the driving force behind the spinning of these storms creating a lot of the storms power. These TRS are either known as hurricanes in the North Atlantic Region or Typhoons in the South East Asia region. However to become a TRS they have...
    1,356 Words | 4 Pages
  • 'the Impact of a Tropical Storm Depends on Location' How Far Do You Agree with This Statement?
    “The Impact of a Tropical Storm depends on location” How far do you agree? Tropical storms formed 5-30 degrees north of the equator, so if there is a largely populated area or economic centre around this latitude, in an area vulnerable to hurricanes, the impact will be increased in comparison to the tropical storm running its course over unpopulated islands or the ocean. This can be seen when looking at Hurricane Sandy, a tropical storm of 2012 and its impact on Cuba. Cuba was located in the...
    828 Words | 2 Pages
  • Outline for Informative Speech on Galveston Hurricane of 1900
    Attention-getter: How many of you feel safe in your homes or know that if a natural disaster struck you would be able to make it out alive? Audience Relevance: Due in large part to the early warning systems we have in place today, we can avoid the vast majority of natural disasters in a way that previous generations could not. C.Speaker Credibility: As a resident of Houston, Texas, I grew up hearing the tales of some of the major Hurricanes that had zeroed in on our coastal region and left it...
    1,277 Words | 4 Pages
  • Barrier Islands Essay - 1182 Words
    Barrier Islands Barrier Islands, which are also known as barrier spits, are elongate, narrow islands of sand or sediment that lied parallel to the coastline and are separated from the mainland by a shallow sound, bay or Lagoon. Most barrier islands are along trailing edge and marginal sea coast where continental shelves are wide and gently sloping. The majority of the barrier islands in North America are along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The formation of the barrier islands is not fully...
    1,182 Words | 3 Pages
  • Katrina Possisble Solutions - 526 Words
    Possible Solutions to prevent another Hurricane Katrina Sea gates are another option that have proven very affective in other areas of the world such as Holland, Britain, and Venice, which is also below sea level and has a large number of canals. Sea gates are simply giant air-filled walls that cut off water flow. These gates would most likely be placed on Lake Pontchartrain’s two narrow outlets and would be only be closed if a storm was approaching. Such structures have been considered since...
    526 Words | 2 Pages
  • Natural Hazards and Disasters in the Caribbean
    NATURAL HAZARDS AND DISASTERS IN THE CARIBBEAN Definitions A hazard can be defined as, “A potentially damaging physical event, phenomenon or human activity that may cause the loss of life or injury, property damage, social and economic disruption or environmental degradation”. Hazards can include latent conditions that may represent future threats and can have different origins: natural (geological, hydrometeorological and biological); or induced by human processes (environmental...
    2,758 Words | 8 Pages
  • Katrina Risk Mangement - 1531 Words
    New Orleans Levee Improvement after Hurricane Katrina ------------------------------------------------- Course Project Elizabeth Sarmento Project Risk Management May 28, 2013 Table of Contents Table of Contents 2 New Orleans: A Perilous Future 3 Fault Tree One 6 Figure 1.1 6 Fault Tree Two 8 Figure 1.2 8 Conclusion 8 A bibliography 9 Introduction New Orleans: A Perilous Future The levees and floodwalls protecting New Orleans from hurricane’s and floods were...
    1,531 Words | 6 Pages
  • Natural Disaster - 298 Words
    Natural Disaster Everyone knows about flood, but did you being in that situation? Can you imagine how painful the victims feel? What is the things that we can do to help them or just sitting at home and watching the victims suffering from the flood? The effects of the natural disaster and measure taken to help the victims. The effects of the natural disaster cause physical damage. For example, bridges, cars, buildings, sewer systems, roadways, canals and any other type of structure. More...
    298 Words | 1 Page
  • New York State: Natural Disaster Sustainability Program: Preparing for the Next Major Hurricane
    New York State: Natural Disaster Sustainability Program: Preparing for the Next Major Hurricane It is an unfortunate reality that societies seem willing to invest in adequate flood risk reduction only after large disasters. The hurricane protection system of New Orleans was improved at a cost of about $14 billion after the tragedy of Hurricane Katrina. The storm surge flooding of 1953 in the Netherlands caused enormous damage and the loss of more than 1,800 lives. This prompted the...
    7,958 Words | 21 Pages
  • Vulnerability Analysis of Bangladesh Due to Multiple Natural Hazards Using Gis Technique
    VULNERABILITY ANALYSIS OF BANGLADESH DUE TO MULTIPLE NATURAL HAZARDS USING GIS TECHNIQUE Dr. Md. Monirul Islam Professor and Chair Department of Civil Engineering IUBAT – International University of Business Agriculture and Technology 4 Embankment Drive Road Sector 10, Uttara Model Town, Uttara, Dhaka 1230 Tel: 02 896 3523-27, 01716 583558, Fax: 02 892 2625 E-mail: rs_gism@yahoo.com Abstract: Bangladesh is one of the most natural disaster prone areas in the World. The different...
    340 Words | 2 Pages
  • WEVA Stands For Walcott Emergency Volunteers Association
    WEVA stands for Walcott Emergency Volunteers Association. Walcott has had a team of volunteers monitoring the sea since 1976 after the sea breached the defences and flooded properties on the sea front including the post office. They were known as Walcott Flood Wardens. Some of them were fishermen so were very familiar with how the weather conditions could cause major problems with the sea. Two of them are still flood wardens today. In 1997, the parish council decided that the flood wardens...
    431 Words | 2 Pages
  • I Survived Hurricane Katrina
    I survived Hurricane Katrina, 2005 By, Lauren Tarshis In New Orleans, Louisiana lived a boy named Barry Tucker. He was 11 eleven years old and lived with him mom, dad and baby sister. Hurricane Katrina was getting ready to land in New Orleans. All families had to evacuate. Barry’s family had boarded up there house and packed up there car. They started heading for Texas. They were stuck in major traffic backed up for two hours. Barry’s little sister became very sick. They decided that...
    372 Words | 1 Page
  • preparing for an hurricane - 734 Words
    Hurricane season (usually lasting from June 1 through November 30 in Jamaica) can be a nerve-racking time for everyone. Hurricanes are not only a concern for those whose homes are in the path of one, but for relatives and friends who may worry about those people. Preparedness is not just essential for dealing with the physical challenges of hurricane season, but having a plan will help you and your loved ones keep their peace of mind during this stressful time. In preparing for a hurricane...
    734 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ess Analysis of Hurricanes - 1698 Words
    ESS Analysis of Hurricanes Thesis Statement: A hurricane is a type of tropical storm that forms in the southern Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Hurricanes can cause significant damage to coastal areas and even several hundred miles inland, depending on the strength of the storm. Hurricanes can cause winds above 150 miles per hour and are categorized 1-5, depending on the strength of the winds, with 1 being the calmest and 5 being the...
    1,698 Words | 7 Pages
  • disaster preparedness - 1138 Words
    Disaster Preparedness Purpose: to raise awareness on the importance of natural disaster preparedness. Thesis: to better understand why natural disaster preparedness is important im going to tell you what natural disasters there are and what they do, how to be prepared, and why we should be prepared for a natural disaster. I. Introduction A. attention getter: B. relevance: C. D. thesis: to better understand why natural disaster preparedness is important im going to...
    1,138 Words | 4 Pages
  • Why Not to Live in Florida
    Despite the several hurricanes that have occurred in Florida the past couple years, I think it's safe to say that Florida can also be a pleasant place to live. With its mostly sunny weather, friendly disposition, and many exciting attractions, Florida almost doesn't seem like the type of place to have such horrific weather at times. I, personally, even after knowing so many good qualities about the sunshine state, still am not convinced that Florida would be a nice place to live. One reason...
    315 Words | 1 Page
  • Hurricane Sandy - 528 Words
    Hurricane Sandy and It’s Effects Hurricane Sandy and It’s Effects Hurricane Sandy struck the east coast only a few weeks ago, yet it is already a part of the history. Millions of people had power and water outage all over the east coast; in small towns as well as in big cities. Many lost their houses while some lost their live, yet the disaster is not something that can be prevented, or avoided. It’s something to be careful of. Everything is...
    528 Words | 2 Pages
  • Natural Disasters - 937 Words
    Risks, Regulations and Management of Natural Disasters Brooke McGuire Park University GO125 Natural Disasters Carla Contes Risks, Regulations and Management of Natural Disasters Introduction There are many risks involved in any natural disaster and the regulation and management of these disasters needs to be simplified and standardized. This essay will summarize two articles that pertain to natural disasters and the improvement of responses and policies surrounded them and...
    937 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hurricane Katrina - 1247 Words
    Aniyah Powell World Cultures 3/30/12 Eggert/5th In August 2005, my life changed. What was home to me, New Orleans, became a memory. I was forced by the natural disaster, Hurricane Katrina, to move to Houston. Hurricane Katrina was a Category 5 hurricane that was very devastating. It ruined on sight everything it passed through. Hurricane Katrina was the deadliest and most destructive Atlantic hurricane[->0] of the 2005 Atlan[->1]- tic oil platforms[->2] and...
    1,247 Words | 5 Pages
  • Salvage the Bones - 961 Words
    FAMU 2012 Freshman Summer Reading Writing Assignment Dijona Brishae’ Clemons August 20, 2012 dijona1.clemons@famu.edu 2. Compare the portrayal of Katrina in Salvage the Bones to what you saw of the hurricane in the news. Which aspect of the storm’s devastation does this novel bring to life? What does Esch’s perspective add to your understanding of Katrina’s impact? When analyzing the horror of Katrina within Ward’s novel Salvage the Bones and the actual catastrophe that was...
    961 Words | 3 Pages
  • Value Based Education - 889 Words
    With climate change causing increasingly chaotic weather patterns, natural disasters are becoming more common across the world. To properly set up plans to protect against natural disasters, it’s important to understand exactly what effects they have on society by looking at past disasters. A natural disaster is anything ranging from a volcanic eruption to a tropical storm. This is regardless of whether the natural disaster was indirectly caused by mankind, like those caused as a result of...
    889 Words | 3 Pages
  • Sea Defense Scheveningen. Inception Report
    Sea Defense Scheveningen Harbor Group Members Isabel Jiménez Puente Fitriani Kusuma Dewi Lijie Qiu Navaratnam Christy Ushanth Group Supervisor Mark Voorendt CIE4061‐09 Multidisciplinary Project 20th February 2012 Sea Defen nse Schevenin ngen Harbor INC CEPTION REPO ORT ultidisciplinar ry Project CIE 4061‐09 Mu PREFACE P The present d document is the inceptio...
    5,738 Words | 18 Pages
  • New Jersey Sea Grant College Program Manual for Coastal Hazard Mitigation
    NEW JERSEY SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM MANUAL FOR COASTAL HAZARD MITIGATION Compiled by Thomas O. Herrington 2 PREFACE New Jersey is often used as an example of a natural system gone awry. The unflattering term "New Jerseyization" was coined by a prominent scientist to describe a developed, eroding coast, where natural beaches have been replaced by engineering structures. This view may have been correct in the past, when seawalls and bulkheads replaced many of our beaches, but our...
    22,874 Words | 71 Pages
  • Hurricane Pam - 773 Words
    Hurricane Pam Every community is faced with natural and man-made hazards that can best be addressed ahead of time by planners working closely with emergency management personnel to mitigate the threat and prepare for post-disaster recovery. Hurricane Pam was a simulated storm in New Orleans used to evaluate potential losses, improve response plans, and provide better coordination between agencies proactively. Hurricane Pam brought sustained winds of 120 mph, up to 20 inches of rain in parts...
    773 Words | 3 Pages
  • Tropical Cyclones - 2075 Words
    Geography Natural hazards: tropical cyclones Year 9 assessment task 3 Sam borron Year 9 Mr Hine Tropical cyclone Larry Geographical processes associated with tropical cyclones Tropical cyclones form over warm oceans (above 26.5˚ C) as low pressure systems and gradually build up intensity. They have clockwise wind circulations and produce gale force winds. These winds can extend hundreds of kilometers from the cyclone center Tropical cyclones can persist for many days...
    2,075 Words | 7 Pages
  • Natural Disaster, Comparing Huadong and Spence Views.
    GO125 Natural Disasters April 4th, 2012 Homework 1 Essay For the purpose of this paper I chose to summarize two articles from the given selection. I have chosen to read an article by Robin Spence titled “Risk and regulation: can improved government action reduce the impacts of natural disasters?”, and another by Huadong Guo titled “Understanding global natural disasters and the role of earth observation”. ARTICLE 1 “Natural disasters have become major threats to human life and the...
    1,650 Words | 5 Pages
  • Natural Disaster - 354 Words
    There have been many natural disasters that have occurred in my city in the past. I live in Yardley and our area usually is not affected by natural disasters. However, disasters such as floods or small tornadoes do happen occasionally, in fact, I experienced one when I was around 8 years of age. During the peak rainy season in Yardley and areas that surrounded the Delaware River there was major flooding. Our city was majorly affected by the natural disaster and small businesses and houses near...
    354 Words | 1 Page
  • MGMT530 –Conference Decision Week 1 Case Analysis MGMT530 –Conference Decision Week 1 Case Analysis
     MGMT530 –Conference Decision Week 1 Case Analysis Wenqing Han D01678446 11/1/13 1) Define the decision problem? This case describes the problem of an accounting system user’s conference cannot be held on time due to the Hurricane Katrina, and the management has to come up with a decision of either moving to a new location or to switch to other dates under all circumstances at a short period of time. 2) What is the general nature...
    467 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cyclone Nargis - 2161 Words
    Cyclone Nargis, crossing the south of Burma over two days, can accord recognition for bringing devastating loss to the Ayeyarwady Delta region , particularly to the extremely vulnerable social groups within. As the United Nation estimates, 2.4 million people were affected due to this category 4 cyclone that sustained winds of 210 km per hour, and in light of this, the mitigation and response following the cyclone proved to be poor and limited. This was accountable to several factors including...
    2,161 Words | 6 Pages
  • Hurricanes and Earthquakes - 1659 Words
    Hurricanes and earthquakes are two of the most dangerous natural disasters in the United States. They can be very disastrous and deadly. In the United States, there have been 73 hurricanes since 1954. Earthquakes are harder to detect because they have to have at least a magnitude of 5 ("Earthquakes per year," 2009). The amount of earthquakes detected in the United States was 1656 in the past 10 years ("Earthquakes per year," 2009). The World Meteorological Organization is the organization that...
    1,659 Words | 5 Pages
  • Composition Essay Hurricane Katrina
    Mark Huntsman and Ayanna Brown College Composition Don Airhart 3/24/2014 Natural disasters can happen at any time causing havoc and panic, and can leave a lasting impression on the nation. Hurricane Katrina was a powerful storm that struck fear throughout many towns and cities. One city that was majorly impacted was the town of New Orleans in Louisiana. With a population of 1,337,726 pre Katrina. New Orleans was a thriving city and was host to the festival well known as Mardi Gras. Bringing...
    783 Words | 3 Pages
  • natural disaster - 374 Words
    When I watched News on the TV, suddenly coming breaking news about disasters. Many disaster exist in the world. Such as earthquakes, hurricane, and other etc. we called natural disaster. My questions start this point. Why disaster only explained by natural disasters? Those disasters only related with natural disaster? If natural disaster coming by difference reason like man-made, did we make any confusion between natural disaster and man-made disaster? Natural Types of...
    374 Words | 2 Pages
  • Case Study on Hurrican Katrina
    Case Study: Hurricane Katrina 2005 What are hurricanes? Hurricanes are storm with violent wind, they are also known as typhoons or cyclones that form in specific conditions. Some hurricanes are more violent than others, the Katrina Hurricane in the year of 2005 was the one of the most strongest, deadliest and most destructive hurricane recorded in the U.S. Where, When, Why, Causes? * Hurricane Katrina affected more than just one area. It was formed over the Bahamas on August 23rd 2005...
    711 Words | 3 Pages
  • Community Health - 1019 Words
    As a community health nurse the most important elements to stress to the community is to ensure steps have been implemented to secure your family, property and business. Developing a Family Disaster Plan is an often overlooked but crucial part of disaster preparedness. Living in Florida we prepare annually for hurricane season from June through November and prepare a hurricane preparation list as follows: Assemble Important Documents In a waterproof container, put important documents like:...
    1,019 Words | 5 Pages
  • Natural Disaster and the Retail Business Owner
    Natural Disaster and the Retail Business Owner Natural Disaster and the Business Owner People make difficult decisions in business everyday. People that make these decisions have to stand by them. The situation in this assignment, speaking of hurricane Katrina, I have mixed feelings on the business owner Brian decision. From a person on the outside looking in perspective, I felt he was wrong for raising the prices of the hotel rooms. But in reality, I had to put myself in the shoes of...
    441 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coastal Protection at Tongatapu Island, Tonga
     Coastal Protection at Tongatapu Island, Tonga: A Report on Initiatives Nuku'alofa beach seawall (Wikimedia.org) Prepared for Sylila Monteiro and Antoinette Wessels, 27 May 2011 By: Tattenai Katoanga (ID:1374937); Mahlon Bonga (ID:1388118); Pim Slagman (ID:1385439) Contents 1.0Introduction 3 1.1 Terms of reference 3 1.2 Procedures 3 1.3 Background 3 3.0 Findings 4 3.1 General environmental threats 4 3.2 Situation in Nuku’alofa 4 3.3...
    1,008 Words | 5 Pages
  • Hurricane Katrina - 1089 Words
    Hurricane Katrina was the most dangerous, deadly, and horrifying storm to ever hit United States. Hurricane Katrina was so powerful that it devastated the lives of the people of New Orleans, Louisiana, as well as other Gulf Coast areas. On August 29, 2005 at 8:00 am, Hurricane Katrina reached Category 5 status. The storm hit the city hard and was the lead story on the national media stage for a number of weeks. The city was wiped out and the clean up and renovation of what is left of The City...
    1,089 Words | 3 Pages
  • Natural Disasters - 474 Words
    Natural Disasters Sudden impacts and slow onset Define the two terms and give example for each Sudden Impacts; The definition of a sudden impact is ‘the occurring or performed quickly and without warning.’ A sudden impact could be an earthquake, tsunami, hurricane. volcano etc. The particular sudden impact I will be looking at is ‘Hurricane Sandy’ Hurricane Sandy was a post-tropical cyclone that swept through the Caribbean and up the East Coast of the...
    474 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Differing Levels of Damage Between Hurricane Katrina and Cyclone Nargis Reflect the Relative Economic Power of the Two Countries
    'The differing levels of damage between Hurricane Katrina and Cyclone Nargis reflect the relative economic power of the two countries' Hurricane Katrina started its formation on the 23rd of August 2005, and Dissipated on the 30th of August 2005. This Hurricane affected most of eastern north america (MEDC)w and was a category 5 hurricane, the winds got up to 175 mph (sustained over 1 min) Cyclone Nargis formed on the 27th of april 2008 and dissipated on 3rd of may 2008, the Cyclone affected...
    655 Words | 2 Pages
  • economic effects of hurricane katrina
    On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the gulf coast of the United States, east of New Orleans,1 with the storm’s eye passing within 10 to 15 miles of the city. The effect on New Orleans, as well as on the entire coastal region, was devastating. In the aftermath of the storm, about 80 percent of the city (much of which is below sea level) was flooded. A recent article estimated damages in excess of $200 billion, making Katrina one of the most economically costly hurricanes ever...
    396 Words | 1 Page
  • Reaction Paper: Hurricane Katrina
    First Reaction Paper: Hurricane Katrina It was the storm that everyone saw coming but no one did a thing to stop it, Katrina. Hurricane Katrina was one of the most devastating hurricanes to strike the United States. The category 5 storm struck a wide swath of destruction in Florida, Mississippi and Louisiana. Katrina is estimated to have caused close to $81 billion in damages (NHC, 2005). A category 5 storm has wind-speeds greater than 155 mph and typical storm water surges are greater...
    2,323 Words | 6 Pages
  • Natural Disasters vs Terrorism
    The threat of natural disasters has been around since the beginnings of the earth. Mankind has never been without the safety concerns and precautions associated with these threats. Yet it seems that in the last one hundred years or so the terroristic threats have become a far greater concern to the U.S. population. If the number of casualties from both threats were compared with each other, the numbers for one would hardly be anywhere near the other. Natural disasters are far more dangerous, yet...
    827 Words | 2 Pages
  • Geology - 744 Words
    How has society responded to coastal changes initiated by sand transportation, and have these responses been wise environmentally and economically? What do you do when mid-latitude cyclones get larger, strong frontal winds are more frequent, and waves and currents get stronger? How can we control high waves and storm surges that drive more sediment transport, permanently changing the coast? Coastal dunes, of all shapes and sizes, are are dense enough to prevent rapid and significant...
    744 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hurricanes Versus Tornados - 907 Words
    Two devastating and deadly natural disasters are the hurricane and the tornado which both cause heavy amounts of damage and are uncontrollable. There are many similarities in how hurricanes and tornadoes are formed. Although they are distinct disasters, hurricanes, and tornadoes pose similar threats to resources because of high winds which can destroy properties and affect the economy along with people’s lives. Both the hurricane, and the tornado are rated on a category scale. First,...
    907 Words | 3 Pages
  • Flood Insurance Hurricane Katrina
    David Benmocha Freshman Essay The Forgotten People of New Orleans On August 29th 2005, Hurricane Katrina struck landfall which began one of the most destructive and deadliest hurricanes in the history of the United States. The hurricane brought over 14 feet in storm surge, winds topping off at 125 mph. With 80% of the city flooded we all knew a lot of money would have to be spent to restore its public and private infrastructures. While New...
    3,335 Words | 8 Pages
  • Zeitoun - 894 Words
    The book Zeitoun by Dave Eggers focuses around the accounts of Abdulrahman and Kathy Zeitoun during Hurricane Katrina. Since this book focuses on mainly one family’s story it can go into great detail and get very personal. You could also say that you feel very engaged with the characters. Zeitoun did cover a lot of the issues during hurricane Katrina but it failed to address all of them. Many men in National Guard uniforms showed up at one of Zeitoun’s properties with guns ready to fire at him...
    894 Words | 2 Pages
  • Top 10 Natural Disasters
    Your Name Professor Course Date Top 10 Natural Disasters Rank 1 Natural Disaster Sichuan Earthquake, China, April 2013 Criteria for Ranking 217 deaths, 14, 11,500 injured, 237, 655 displaced, 2.1 million affected Date April 20, 2013, 8:02 a.m. Location Lushan County of Ya’an city in South China’s Sichuan Province Type Earthquake (Magnitude 7.0) Description The earthquake resulted in an estimated 217 deaths, 11,500 injured, 655 people displaced, and 193,000 houses...
    3,376 Words | 13 Pages
  • Coastal Management - 528 Words
    As the coastal management expert of Southerland Shire I have come up with the most appropriate way to manage this problem. Storm surges are effects of severe storm systems due to a rise in sea level, if a storm surge and a tide meet when reaching the coast line severe damage can occur; resulting in extreme flooding in coastal areas, leading to damaging buildings surrounding the coastline. To prevent this problem and minimize storm surges having such a large impact and causing severe damage to...
    528 Words | 2 Pages
  • climate change essay - 1267 Words
    Climate change is the most significant challenge to achieving sustainable development and threatens to drag thousands of people to severe poverty. It refers to any outstanding measures of climate lasting for an extended period of time. This includes major changes in temperature, precipitation or winds patterns and others that occur several days longer. Some Caribbean islands in particular are vulnerable to climate change. Rising sea levels will have a consequential and dampening effect on their...
    1,267 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hurricane Katrina - 720 Words
    Angela K Sites Composition II-42: ENC 1102-42 Professor Richard Kamerman February 9, 2013 August 29, 2005 presented the residents of New Orleans, Louisiana a devastating blow. A category five hurricane made landfall and wiped out life as they knew it. Hurricane Katrina was one of the most deadly to hit the United States. One thousand eight hundred and thirty six people lost their lives and this incident provoked many to wonder, how could this happen? Loss of life was tragic and the...
    720 Words | 2 Pages
  • New Orleans Levees - 1760 Words
    For years now the discussions have arose about the levee systems in America and how some are not safe and need to be replaced. This problem has been focused on the levee system in New Orleans. Many engineers and other people have asked the question whether or not the present levee system in New Orleans could withstand a huge wave or a direct hit from a powerful hurricane. These questions were answered when Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans as a Category 3 hurricane which isn't even the most...
    1,760 Words | 5 Pages
  • Natural Phenomena - 854 Words
    Natural Phenomena Criteria Describe how any three natural phenomena impact/have impacted Caribbean Social and Economic life in the past and present Caribbean.  Phenomena chosen:  Hurricane  Earthquake  Volcano Introduction Natural Phenomena: An event occurring which is not man-made; it is of nature  Examples include:  Sunrise  Weather (Hurricanes, Earthquakes, etc.)  Biological Processes (germination, decomposition, etc.)  Varying types of natural phenomena exists which may...
    854 Words | 8 Pages
  • Technology Crisis - 1030 Words
    Kaila Marie Letteri November 12, 2012 CIT 110 Professor Ganis How Technology Helps in a Crisis Technology runs our world. Many people rely on it everyday for many reasons and functions. What happens if a natural disaster strikes and all of a sudden these everyday items become no longer useful? When disasters strike we often lose abilities to use our technological items due to many reasons. However, we do have some technologies that can help before, through, and after a...
    1,030 Words | 3 Pages
  • Tropical Cyclones & Floods & Droughts
    Tropical Cyclones & Floods & Droughts: Australia is well known for it's natural disasters including BushFires, Floods, Droughts and Tropical Cyclones. The major disasters being Tropical Cyclones and Droughts. A cyclone is a large-scale, atmospheric wind and pressure system characterized by low pressure at it's centre and by circulating motion, counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. An example of a tropical cyclone is Australia's deadliest one...
    827 Words | 3 Pages
  • Multiple Governments and Intergovernmental Relationships
    Multiple Governments and Intergovernmental Relationships Marlin P. McFate POL 215 July 1, 2013 Rochelle Allen Multiple Governments and Intergovernmental Relationships To be successful as a unified or United States, meaning a group with the same but often times different agendas, a few things had to become true. First the individual governments of these states had to feel that their best interests were represented within the united whole. Second that their powers within their borders...
    774 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hurricane Katrina - 769 Words
     The Economic Impact of Hurricane Katrina Sid van der Woude Natural Disasters EES:1400:A08 2/19/2015 Once the storm finally passed, the flood waters finally receded, and the levees were put into some sort of repair, Hurricane Katrina, through its path of destruction left New Orleans and the surrounding areas in one of the costliest states of disrepair ever seen from a natural disaster in U.S. history. From the damage to infrastructure, to the lost jobs, to the loss of...
    769 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hello! - 342 Words
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  • Natural Disasters - 2033 Words
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  • Hurricane Katrina: A Disaster Waiting to Happend
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  • Hurricane Katrina: Development and Devastation
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