Domestication Essays & Research Papers

Best Domestication Essays

  • Domestication - 338 Words
    Domestication is defined in the article as the manipulation of plants and animals to suit human needs. The article states that it is a gradual process, and domestication itself is not initially the goal. Domestication is the result of human efforts over an extended amount of time in which a species evolves to fit a desireable genotype/phenotype. In the reading it is also stated that domestication may have sparked social change in Africa. With domestication came herding and pastoral lifestyle, a...
    338 Words | 1 Page
  • Domestication of Plants and Animals - 1392 Words
    The domestication of plants and animals lead to great change in the development and structuring of communities, as the hunter-gatherer lifestyle was slowly replaced by permanent settlements of farmers and villages. We can see that the communities varied greatly dependent on their local ecology, the resources available, and the time period within which their community was based. The road to agricultural way of life in the MIddle East is characterized by Four distinct stages. It was during the...
    1,392 Words | 4 Pages
  • Animal Assisted Interventions In Historical Perspective And The Domestication Of Animals
    Anth 68 Day 7 Animal-assisted interventions in Historical Perspective Serpell talks about how animals are connected to illness and recovery. He starts out by describing animistic belief and their interpretation of animals and their spirits. He states that followers of the animistic worldview believe that a sickness or misfortune is caused on a person because of an angry or malevolent spirit. Furthermore, he says that some people believe in going to the spirit world and becoming a spiritual...
    573 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Domestication of Plants and Animals in Central/East Asia
    At around 12,500 B.C.E, the domestication of animals and plants first arose. The domestication of animals and plants allowed early humans to manipulate the standard of living and heredity of plants and animals. Domestication took generations to achieve due to understanding the environment they inhabit. Domesticators gained many advantages that they didn’t have when they were hunters and gatherers. Between 7000 B.C.E and 500 B.C.E, the domestication of animals and plants in Central and East Asia...
    697 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Domestication Essays

  • The Effect of Agriculture On Civilization - 726 Words
    Agriculture is the foundation from which civilization started from. If we did not have agriculture we would still be wandering around hunting small game and gathering anything edible that we might find. We would also have a very low population rate because we would not be able to stalk prey with a lot of people and we would have to kill more animals then there would be to survive. There is something good about not having agriculture. We would not have made so much pollution and the hole in the...
    726 Words | 2 Pages
  • GGS chapter 2 - 2846 Words
    Olivia Lanning Blanc AP World- Summer Assignment- Pre Reading 1. What is your definition of world history? World history is the study of everyone and everything that has existed from the earliest point studied to present day. It includes all areas of the world and everything that has happened, often going into why things happen, and what happens afterwards. 2. What interests you about studying history? What does not? Studying history is interesting to me because you can see the...
    2,846 Words | 9 Pages
  • Jared Diamond Paper - 1438 Words
    Emily Professor Fechner Rhetoric and Writing Studies 100 Section 69 29 September 2013 Was Jared Diamond’s Argument Effective in His Talk about Human History? Human history evolved a certain way on all the different continents around the globe. Europeans progressed significantly faster than the Native Americans on all the other continents around the world. This progression could be attributed to a variety of factors; however, Jared Diamond focuses on one specific reason. A scientist at...
    1,438 Words | 4 Pages
  • Guns Germs and Steel - 1959 Words
    Major Themes of Guns, Germs, and Steel As Jared Diamond examines the major factors of a great civilization after being posed by Yali’s question, he comes to an astounding realization. It is that Asians and Europeans came to be powerful not because they were smarter or better than other civilizations, but because they were luckier in terms of geography. Diamond focuses on the idea that the success of a society is not catalyzed by genetics or natural superiority, but instead by these two...
    1,959 Words | 6 Pages
  • Domesticated Pet Rabbits - 813 Words
    Animal Trivia Dogs * There are more than 150 dog breeds, divided into 8 classes: sporting, hound, working, terrier, toy, non-sporting, herding, and miscellaneous. * According to a recent survey, the most popular name for a dog is Max. Other popular names include Molly, Sam, Zach, and Maggie. * Dogs can vary in size from a 36 inch (150+ lb.) Great Dane to a 2 lb. Chihuahua. * Puppies and kittens can be adopted as early as 8 weeks of age. Until then, they should stay with their...
    813 Words | 3 Pages
  • Difference and Similarities of the Chavins and Phoenicians
    Phoenicians and the Chavins Dating back to the beginning of civilizations, many people didn't have all of the great technology and brain power that we are presented with today. The people had to ban together to make societies so that they could work together to bring about their needs of survival, and ours for that matter. From economic to land use, to foreign affairs, the Chavin and the Phoenician societies are both alike and different in many ways. With their skill at traveling by sea...
    466 Words | 2 Pages
  • the columbian exchange vs triangular trade
    The Columbian Exchange Vs. the Triangular trade What is the Columbian exchange? Many people may have never heard this term before. The Columbian exchange began after Columbus begins to make “settlements” in the “new world” in the year 1492. Now, you may think how does finding a new civilization cause and exchange. Well, the Columbian exchange was not all about products and culture. In reality, it was mostly dealing with the biological effects of the “immigrants” on the natives. When the...
    581 Words | 2 Pages
  • Guns, Germs, and Steel Study Guide
    AP World History Summer Reading Assignment Guns, Germs, and Steel Chapter 1: Up to the Starting Line Q: What was the Great Leap Forward? Describe the life of a Cro-Magnon person. What impact did the arrival of humans have on big animals? Provide an example. Which continent had a head start in 11,000 BCE (Before Common Era)? A: the great leap forward was when human history first began to take off and the humans at that time began to become more like us modern humans today. The humans...
    1,469 Words | 4 Pages
  • Guns, Germs, and Steel
    AP World History Summer Reading “Guns, Germs and Steel” A.) In the Prologue of Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond, a local politician name Yali asks Jared Diamond a question, the answer to it is explain throughout the rest of the book. His question, “‘Why is it that you white people developed so much cargo and brought it to New Guinea, but we black people had little cargo of our own?’” By this, Yali wants to know why the advancements in some areas are greater than in others, why there...
    3,534 Words | 9 Pages
  • Domestic or wild animal - 606 Words
    A domesticated animal is any animal that depends on a human for food, water and shelter this includes farm animals such as cattle, horses, sheep, chickens, goats, dogs and cats. There are relatively few domesticated animals compared to the huge number of species on the planet. As well as the obvious there are also a couple of species of insect (e.g. the silk worm) that are classified as domesticated. Certain birds, besides chickens and fish, are also considered domestic, even a species of...
    606 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jared Diamond Gea Essay
    Jared Diamond is a biologist whose area of expertise is birds. His studies took him to Papua New Guinea, where he utilized his skills to study all of the bird species inhabiting the island. One day, a PNG inhabitant, Yali, came up and asked Diamond a question: “Why is it that you white people developed so much cargo, but we black people had little cargo of our own?” Diamond argues that the answer to Yali’s question wasn’t racial inequality like so many people assume it is. Diamond began his...
    1,014 Words | 3 Pages
  • Guns Germs and Steel Book Study
    Taylor Shockley Guns, Germs, and Steel A. YORK Period 4 Research: Write a short biography of the author, include information about his areas of research, books written, and prizes awarded. Jared Diamond is a professor at the University of California He wanted wrote Guns, Germs, and Steel, which won the Britain’s 1998 Rhone-Poulenc Science Book Prize and Pulitzer Prize. He also wrote Collapse: How Societies choose to Fail or Succeed. Jared has been on 22 expeditions to New Guienea...
    3,088 Words | 11 Pages
  • Why Did Human History Unfold Differently on Different Continents
    This problem has fascinated me for a long time, but it’s now ripe for a new synthesis because of recent advances in many fields seemingly remote from history, including molecular biology, plant and animal genetics, biogeography, archaeology, and linguistics. Eurasians have spread around the globe to dominate the modern world in wealth and power Africans survived & have thrown off European domination but remained behind in wealth and power Contrarily, inhabitants of Australia, the Americas,...
    2,018 Words | 6 Pages
  • Reading Log One, 1
    LEFT HAND PAGE | RIGHT HAND PAGE | Santich, B and G. Bryant. 2008. “Gatherers To Growers” In Edible: The Illustrated Guide to the world’s Food Plants, 14-19. Australia: Cameron House | Santich, B and G. Bryant. 2008. “Gatherers To Growers” In Edible: The Illustrated Guide to the world’s Food Plants, 14-19. Australia: Cameron House | In this book chapter Santich and Bryant looks at how our ancestors became more efficient in improving their living conditions. They described how our ancestors...
    711 Words | 2 Pages
  • Perfect Pet - 295 Words
    Pet Rats Pet rats are one of the most misunderstood animals that people keep as pets. When I tell someone that I have pet rats they say things like: ”Ew! thats gross” and “rats carry disease”. However, rats are one of the oldest types of domesticated animals and is also the friendliest. Rats are very social animals, people who have rats usually keep two or more together. Rats like play fighting with one another and will sometimes make friends with other animals like guinea pigs. Which is...
    295 Words | 1 Page
  • Why Europe - 5082 Words
    “WHY EUROPE” INQUIRY WHY WAS IT EUROPE, AND NOT ANYONE ELSE WHO EXPLORED AND CONQUERED THE REST OF THE WORLD? WHAT ARE WE GOING TO DO?  We are going to do historical analysis as a class and try to figure out why it was the Europeans and not anyone else who explored and conquered the rest of the world.  We will do this by following the steps that historians take: looking at and evaluating primary and secondary documents and submitting our theories for examination by other historians. HOW...
    5,082 Words | 41 Pages
  • Ap Guns Germs And Steel
    Guns, Germs, and Steel Chapter 1: “Up to the Starting Line” 1. When did the history of humans begin? Around 50,000 years ago. “Human history at last took off around 50,000 years ago...” (Page 39) 2. Humans developed on what continent? Humans developed in Africa. “…, indicates that the earliest stages of human evolution were also played out in Africa.” (Page 36) 3. The Giant Leap forward occurred when? Around the time human history started, 50,000 years ago. “Human History at last took...
    3,483 Words | 14 Pages
  • anthropology reaction paper - 971 Words
    Reaction Paper #1 In the textbook, different authors explain Lewis Henry Morgan’s definition of unilineal evolution in the introductory section to Richard Nelson’s essay “Eskimo Science” (2012:87). Unilineal evolution is a social theory about the evolution of societies and cultures, and that all societies evolve in one direction from a stage of savagery through one of civilization. According to Morgan, it is the idea that hunter-gatherers don’t think as sophisticated as the ones found in the...
    971 Words | 3 Pages
  • Taming of the Shrew Critical Review
    The Taming of the Shrew Some would agree that since the first chronicle of time, men have felt, in fact embraced their illusion of dominance over their women. This is distinguished constantly throughout history in many forms; through spoken word, imagery, and literature. The character Petruccio, from William Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, is one such example. As referred to in his soliloquy at the end of Act IV scene I, Petruccio speaks on his method towards taming young Katherine...
    1,486 Words | 4 Pages
  • Against Wild Animals as Pets
    Wild Animals as Pets “Between 13,000 and 2,500 B.C., humans domesticated dogs, cats, cattle, goats, horses, and sheep from their wild counterparts. Although the terms taming and domestication are often used interchangeably, they are not the same. Individual wild animals can be tamed to behave in a docile manner around humans. By contrast, domestication is a process that takes place with an entire animal species over many generations.” (libraryindex.com) Humans began domesticating large...
    2,495 Words | 7 Pages
  • Guns Germs and Steel Chapter Summary
    Prologue: Yali’s Question Jared Diamond has done extensive field work in New Guinea. His indigenous New Guinean politician friend Yali asked why whites had been so successful and arrived with so much "cargo" compared to the locals. Diamond rephrases this question: why did white Eurasians dominate over other cultures by means of superior guns, population-destroying germs, steel, and food-producing capability? Diamond’s main thesis is that this occurred not because of racial differences in...
    2,524 Words | 8 Pages
  • Guns, Germs, and Steel Chapter by Chapter Summary
    Chapter 1 1. The main lesson of chapter one was explaining how humans came to be and major jumps in our development. 2. I agree with diamonds ideas because it is scientifically proven that humans started by evolving from monkeys in Africa 3. That people developed certain things suddenly instead of gradually, that the clovis was responsible for many mass extinctions of large mammals around 11,000 B.C. Chapter 2 1. Looks at the effect of the climate on the civilization being a small group...
    969 Words | 3 Pages
  • Advantage Ang Disadvantage of Animals in Captivity
    1. INTRODUCTION Animals that live under human care are in captivity. Captivity can be used as a generalizing term to describe the keeping of either wild animals or domesticated animals such as livestock and pets. This may include for example farms, private and zoos. Keeping animals in human captivity and under human care can thus be distinguished between three primary categories according to the particular motives, objectives and conditions. The domestication of animals is the oldest documented...
    1,022 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Early Modern Period- the Columbian Exchange
    The Columbian Exchange was a time when global diffusion of plants/crops, animals, human populations, and disease took place after voyages of exploration by European mariners. The Columbian Exchange effected both Europe and America from 1492-1750 in a similar way because they gained new resources and gave resources to each other; however, they differ in that Europe was affected in a greater quality, and America was affected in a more unfavorable way. The plants/crops that Europe received from...
    315 Words | 1 Page
  • Answers to Questions About the Book Guns, Germs and Steel
    Milo Fradianni Germs, Guns and Steel WHAP Gavigan Guns, Germs, and Steel The Fates of Human Societies Jared Diamond Prologue: Throughout the book; Guns, Germs, and Steel, Jared Diamond answers a very controversial question; why is it that European people developed so much cargo and brought it to New Guinea, but the natives of New Guinea had little cargo of their own? Societies prosper depending on the abundance of natural resources which are at their...
    1,456 Words | 5 Pages
  • Chapter Summary of Guns Germs and Steel
    1. How humans came into existence was talked about along with the major advances in the world’s development. It is proven that humans did evolve from monkeys in Africa. There is some arguments around if there were pre-Clovis people or not, but James Diamond says evidence would’ve been found by now. 2. The Maori and Moriori are the descendants of the Polynesians. Because they had a larger and denser population, the Maori people were more technologically advanced with more complex societies and...
    821 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wild Animal as Pet?? - 1321 Words
    Don't Take Wild Animals in as Pets Heather Davis Many people in the world get pets every day, but why blame them? There's nothing wrong with having a friend of another species. But, if you want a pet, there is one thing you shouldn't do. You should never take an animal from the wild, and keep them as pets. The reasons are pretty clear. I, myself, have learned from self-experience that they are tougher to take care of than your average cat, dog, bird, or fish. They are not...
    1,321 Words | 4 Pages
  • agriculture - 305 Words
    more stuff Agriculture: Many of the plant foods we take for granted came from the Columbian Exchange. The one everyone talks about is the potato and its effect on Ireland. Feed corn is another New World plant. If we look at the effect of the potato and corn on Europe and America (European culture in the New World) we see that these two starches made possible an explosion in the numbers of humans and domestic animals the culture could support. In his book "Guns, Germs, and Steel," Jared...
    305 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Agricultural Revolution - 1235 Words
    The Neolithic Revolution is the term for the first agricultural revolution. This revolution in particular is characterized by the transition from hunting and gathering to that of agriculture. Twelve thousand years ago history had changed itself. Ninety percent of the human race gave up hunting game and gathering fruits, vegetables, and grasses to practice agriculture, the growing of crops and domesticating animals. Once agriculture was established the effect it had on peoples’ lives was...
    1,235 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Ethics of Keeping Pets - 597 Words
    Animals are the under-appreciated co-inhabitants of our planet. I believe that animals should be afforded equal consideration to humans. The only criteria for equal treatment should be the ability to feel pain. As we can demonstrate that all animals with a backbone can feel pain, then all animals with a backbone should be treated with equal consideration to humans. Their needs should be considered and met in the same way a human's would be. This however does not mean that the natural order...
    597 Words | 2 Pages
  • How European Attitudes, Deforestation and the Introduction of Biological Factors shaped American Environmental History
    MJ How European Attitudes, Deforestation and the Introduction of Biological Factors shaped American Environmental History In 1492, Christopher Columbus set sail from the Eastern coast of Europe seeking to find a shorter passage to what He believed would lead him to the Indies. Yet, in his quest for the Indies, Columbus stumbled on a land far greater and completely breathtaking…the Americas. Although Columbus and his crew were well aware of what they discovered, at least to a certain extent...
    1,690 Words | 5 Pages
  • Do Human Beings Have All the Rights to Domesticate Animals?
    I agree to a certain extent that human beings have all the right to domesticate animals since they are the superior species. Human beings are concerned about losing their “diversity” if they no longer have the domesticated animals. Domestication is not morally acceptable and these domesticated animals are not natural at all as they are created by us through selective breeding and confinement. Humans should first protect those undomesticated animals living in nature and then use them for...
    283 Words | 1 Page
  • Pets: Neolithic Revolution and Pet
    For and against essay of having a pet Pets have accompanied mankind since the dawn of history. Allegedly, the domestication of animals begun along with the Neolithic Revolution (approximately between 10-12 thousand years ago). Some people either hate or love this accompaniment. For sure, there are various disadvantages and advantages of having a pet, which I will try to point out in my essay. In my opinion, one major advantage of having a pet is that they can replace people and become one...
    293 Words | 1 Page
  • Catal Huyuk - 450 Words
    Catal Huyuk Formal Analysis Catal Huyuk, a community village believed to have exist sometime between 6500 ' 5500 BCE, is the largest Neolithic site currently preserved, and, furthermore, the only village of its kind that has been recorded in history. Catal Hulk is located in the south of Analtolia, which is referred to now as modern day Turkey. As far as preservation goes, Catal Hulk has withstood the test of time in fairly good condition ' after 8,000 years the site was discovered in...
    450 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reaction Guns Germs and Steel
    I really liked the video and thought it was real interesting. I do pretty much agree to what I have heard so far. I agree that all the great civilizations had in common that they all had advanced technology, a large population, and an organized work for. I think the same applies kind of to big companies: The all have advanced technology, have a lot of workers, and have an organized work force. I already knew about crop domestication, but I can, again, make a connection of the proses to big...
    351 Words | 1 Page
  • Guns Germs Steel - 528 Words
    The book Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond attempts to answer the question, “Why is it that you white people developed so much cargo and brought it to New Guinea, but we black people had so little cargo of our own?” This question was asked by Yali, a New Guinean politician talking to Jared Diamond. Jared Diamond answers this question by analyzing the development of civilization across the globe, from the deserts of Africa to the woodlands of North America. Each of these civilizations...
    528 Words | 2 Pages
  • Guns Germs Steel - 1375 Words
    Guns, Germs and Steel Jared Diamond, author of the Pulitzer Prize Winning, National Best Selling book Guns, Germs and Steel, summarizes his book by saying the following: "History followed different courses for different peoples because of differences among peoples' environments, not because of biological differences among peoples themselves." Guns, Germs and Steel is historical literature that documents Jared Diamond's views on how the world as we know it developed. However, is his thesis that...
    1,375 Words | 4 Pages
  • Guns Germs and Steel Packet
    Name: __________________________ World History Unit Two: Global Inequality An Overview of Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs, and Steel Why do some nations have so much material wealth while so many others have so little? This was the question Jared Diamond posed in his book Guns, Germs, and Steel. After identifying a point in time when all societies were roughly equal (over 13,000 years ago), Diamond identified the key variables that allowed some societies to develop highly complex,...
    3,885 Words | 14 Pages
  • Visual Analysis Assignment - 795 Words
    The Incense Burner of Amir Saif al-Dunya wa’l-Din ibn Muhammad al-Mawardi Ja`far ibn Muhammad ibn `Ali, is an Iranian bronze; cast, engraved, chased, pierced Overall. H. 33 1/2 in. (85.1 cm) L. 32 1/2 in. (82.6 cm) W. 9 in, currently present in the Islamic Art section, in the Iranian area on a two foot high platform, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. The item was made for a Prince Saif al-Dunya wa’l-Din ibn Muhammad al-Mawardi, it is both decorative and functional as an...
    795 Words | 2 Pages
  • "Call of the Wild" Book Review
    "Call of the Wild" Book Review By: Sheldon Shepard What if you were torn away from your home, your life, your family, and everything that was ever familiar to you, and got thrown into harsh, life threatening situations? Would you adapt in order to live and survive or would you be totally enveloped in the chaos and just give up, and become a name unmentioned? In Jack London's book "Call of the Wild", we are taught that anyone or thing can be taken from its surroundings and hurled into a...
    872 Words | 3 Pages
  • cat lover - 7598 Words
    A. There is a serious cat overpopulation problem in Australia. One factor contributing to this problem is people feeding unowned cats but not taking full ownership or responsibility for them (eg they don’t desex or identify them, or keep them on their property). Feeding unowned cats helps regenerate cat colonies by keeping cats alive and strong enough to reproduce. This campaign aims to educate the community about the consequences of feeding unowned cats, and the impact it is having on the...
    7,598 Words | 20 Pages
  • The Neolithic Revolution - 304 Words
    An important turning point in world history that affected everyone was the Neolithic Revolution. The Neolithic Revolution began in Southwest Asia and occurred between 8000 B.C.E – 4000 B.C.E. The Neolithic Revolution is an important turning point in history because it allowed people to create civilization. These civilizations were allowed to come to form because of the change in weather from freezing cold...
    304 Words | 1 Page
  • Guns, Germs, and Steel
    Guns, Germs, and Steel This movie was very interesting and informative about how civilizations developed and thrived. The narrator of the movie, Jared Diamond, has been studying evolution of humans for 30 years and based his studies in New Guinea. While there, he was asked the questions he has been trying to answer for years. A young man named Yali asked him, "Why you white men have so much cargo and we New Guineans have so little". He noticed that the white men had so much more material...
    606 Words | 2 Pages
  • Summaries of Guns Germs and Steel
    Prologue: Yali's Question Jared Diamond has done much research in New Guinea. His friend, local New Guinean; Yali, asked why whites had been so successful compared to the locals. Diamond, while looking into Yali’s question, wants to prove that the differences in success have nothing to do with racial intelligence, but rather environmental differences. He starts with saying that stone people "are on the average probably more intelligent, not less intelligent, than industrialized peoples." He...
    2,503 Words | 8 Pages
  • The Cat and the Mouse - 720 Words
    If-Sätze Typ I, II und III The Cat and the Mouse © by Lingo4you – www.lingo4u.de Once upon a time there lived a cat and a mouse. One fine day, the cat bit the mouse's tail off. "Give me back my tail," said the mouse. And the cat said, "Well, I (give) _____________________1 you back your tail if you fetched me some milk. But that's impossible to do for a little mouse like you." The mouse, however, went to the cow. "The cat (give / only) ____________________ 2 me back my tail if I fetch...
    720 Words | 3 Pages
  • America Before Columbus - 672 Words
    America Before Columbus In the age just before Columbus sailed the ocean blue, there was abundant life, lifestyles, and necessities that sustained that. In the 1500s, Europe was as tense as ever. Kings and popes raise armies to fight against one another. The population capacity of Europe at this time was around one hundred million people. At this point, Isabella, the Queen of Spain, is the most powerful woman in Europe as well. Livestock and agriculture grown in Europe became...
    672 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jared Diamond - 1100 Words
    Jared Diamond ​Jared Diamond was a professor at UCLA in Los Angeles. He was a biologist by training, and a specialist in human physiology. But his real passion has always been the study of birds. He began watching the birds when he was about seven years old in the United States. He arrived in New Guinea at the age of 26 and he felt that it was love at first sight. Diamond started to make regular trips to New Guinea and ever since, he decides to be the leading expert on the bird life of the...
    1,100 Words | 3 Pages
  • Neolithic Revolution - 273 Words
    Neolithic Revolution The Neolithic Revolution was a major turning point in history. It is the time when the early use technology. Some of the technology consisted of sophisticated stone tools, pottery and farming. This is also the time when they began to domesticate animals such as goats, cows and some of the other usual farm animals. People called Hunter-gatherers also came into place during this time period. This is also known as the agricultural revolution. During this period tools...
    273 Words | 1 Page
  • Pox Americana - 310 Words
    “Pox Americana” – Infectious Disease and the Decline of Native Populations I. American as Virgin Soil a. The origins of common “childhood diseases” in the Old World i. “density dependent” = diseases of high-population areas- first cities got the first diseases ii. The role of livestock -eating and drinking the milk of live stock supplied Europe with a lot of diseases iii. Lifetime immunity as a result of exposure...
    310 Words | 2 Pages
  • Serdni Vashtar - 531 Words
    In front of the great pearly white gates stood a young boy by the name of Conradin. I knew of him, and had been debating as to what to do about him for a long time now. His case was rather peculiar, not like many I've seen before. Oh what to do, what to do, (I wouldn’t want this decision to haunt me for the rest of eternity) Wait I'm getting ahead of myself my name is St.Peter. I'm one of the twelve apostles of Jesus. I stand at the pearly gates deciding whether you go to heaven or hell (what a...
    531 Words | 2 Pages
  • Origin of Agriculture (Short) - 374 Words
    Ch 10 Agriculture Origins of Agriculture The last thirty years have seen a revolution in our understanding of the origins of agriculture. What was once seen as a pattern of unilateral human exploitation of domesticated crops and animals has now been described as a pattern of coevolution and mutual domestication between human beings and their various domesticates. A new concept is now commonly viewed as the adoption of techniques and ultimately an economy long known to foragers in which...
    374 Words | 1 Page
  • Jared Diamond "Around the World in 40 Minutes"
    Name ______________ Period __ Article Summary – write a short summary of Jared Diamond’s speech including the main idea or central theme of his argument. Jared Diamond’s speech focuses on the fact that Europeans conquered the New World, Africa, and Australia before they could get to Europe thanks to the domestication of plants and animals, which sped up the rate of the development of civilization. Short Answer Questions 1. Why does Diamond argue that wealth and power are distributed...
    347 Words | 2 Pages
  • Guns, Germs, and Steel Summer Reading
    Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond Prologue 1. Summarize Yali’s question. This requires mentioning race, intelligence, and development of technology. Yali asks "why is it that you white people developed so much cargo and brought it to New Guinea, but we black people had little cargo of our own?" What Yali is asking is about the origins of inequality between countries and societies in the world. He wants to know why people of European descent are rich and powerful while people like...
    4,183 Words | 12 Pages
  • The Neolithic Revolution: An Important Historical Paradox
    In the transition from hunting-gathering to permanent settlement, people’s lives were dependent upon the rapidly developing new methods of living during the Neolithic Revolution. Domestication of animals and plants became common in different parts of the world over 3,000 years. Small groups of people came together to form complex societies with villages and towns. Food-storage technologies and irrigation were taking over. People now had more time to develop their creativity and innovations, and...
    404 Words | 2 Pages
  • Discovering Guinea Pigs - 2088 Words
    Project Title: discovering guinea pigs Discovering Cavia porcellus (DISCOVERING GUINEA PIGS) Proposed to: Ms. Maureen Jean Lara, MAIC Prepared by: Innah Janesa C. de Peralta Geraldine T. Gekin Bea Salvosa Ivy Dy Ruiz (BS Psychology 2B) Date of Proposal: January 09, 2012 I. Project Description and General Information Since the world of Science has evolved, the experiments of scientists and other researchers also improve and get more...
    2,088 Words | 9 Pages
  • The Neolithic Revolution - 549 Words
    The Neolithic Revolution For the duration of mans existence vast changes have taken place that have drastically shifted the course of history. The repercussions of these turning points can be interpreted as positive or negative, depending on the point of view of each individual. There were many major turning points in the line of history. One very major turning point is the Neolithic revolution. The Neolithic revolution is seen as a huge change because it shifted the way of living from a...
    549 Words | 2 Pages
  • History of Economics - 2121 Words
    Economics 515 Midterm 1 1. Economic growth vs. economic development, define extensive growth & intensive growth Economic growth is the sustained increase in the output of goods/services of a society. Economic development is economic growth plus changes in technical and institutional arrangements by with output are produced. Extensive growth- increase in output due to increase in inputs (labor force grows, land stock increases) Intensive growth- increase in output per unit of input –...
    2,121 Words | 10 Pages
  • MERGE - 1095 Words
    Torturing Puppies and Eating Meat: It’s all in Good Taste Americans love their meat. From hotdogs and hamburgers all the way to more profound delicacies such as veil, meat is prevalent in the majority of Americans diet. What is less prevalent is the knowledge of where the meat comes from and how it ends up on their plate. The days of livestock roaming the open field are done. The current system of factory farming has grim practices. Nowadays Old McDonalds farm isn’t so happy. It is common...
    1,095 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Neolithic Period - 438 Words
    The term Neolithic means New Stone Age, and this was a period where human technology developed. One of the most important developments in human history was the discovery of farming. This was known as the Neolithic Revolution. In addition to learning to farm, humans learned to domesticate animals. This brought about a drastic change for mankind. Once man learned to farm, they began to settle. Permanent settlements started to develop along river valleys due to the fact that rivers provided...
    438 Words | 2 Pages
  • Animal Cruelty: an Ongoing Issue
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